A perfect day in Bali

Posted on Posted in Nomad Life

I never thought that meeting Italians in Bali, Daniela and Gianpaolo, would bring me closer to the Balinese culture. On a beautiful Sunday morning, we hit the road for Uluwatu Temple and beach at the Bukit peninsula.

First pit stop was the Jimbaran Fish market. Having had no Gianpaolo with me, I would never have had the courage to go to such dodgy place. And also, I don’t usually like fish. I wondered if there is some black market attached to this place, dealing with endangered species, as Indonesia is sadly known for. But, regardless my doubts, what looked dodgy, was actually quite an OK fish market, where you can get all the different fresh seafood. The best part was yet to come: after filling up our bag with all kinds of delicacies, we went over to a small local eatery, where they cooked the fish on the fire for us. The freshly bought snapper, fire-grilled, was simply a pleasure to eat!

VIDEO: Entering the fish market

 

One of the vendors (and a fisherman, I guess)
One of the vendors (and a fisherman, I guess)
You can find variety of sea food here
You can find variety of sea food here
New delivery!
New delivery!
The fish cooked to perfection
The fish cooked to perfection
Our lunch
Our lunch
Grilled snapper
Grilled snapper
All fed!
All fed!

With a satisfying smile, we paid (150 000 Rupiah/10€ each) and left for the next on our list: Uluwatu beach. Having been almost alone on a beach just the day before, Uluwatu beach looked super crowded to me, but the beautiful surroundings made up for that. We couldn’t really swim there as the currents and waves are to strong and we wouldn’t have ended up smashed on the rocks. So we spent some quality-time in shallow waters of the Indian ocean watching people surfing in the distance, enjoying that we are able to do that!

The Uluwatu beach
The Uluwatu beach
Surfers at the beach
Surfers at the beach

Near the Uluwatu beach, there is the Uluwatu temple build on the cliffs, surrounded by the sea. While I really liked the spectacular nature around, it was also very touristy and people with selfie-sticks were taking all the room at the viewing platforms. In the temple area, there are also some monkeys, trying to steal everything shiny and food looking. Having learnt my lesson from the Monkey Forest in Ubud where a monkey searched the side pockets of camera bag and with a very skilled move took out my motorbike key and a lip balm, I put all my valuables securely into my bag.

View from the Uluwatu temple
View from the Uluwatu temple

On the way back we were hit by a heavy rain and I was soaking wet within minutes. However, the bad weather left us as quickly as it had come and we dried on the motorbike ride home. Stopping in Sanur and meeting Gianpaolo’s friend Agung, we went to dine in a local warung where we let him to order some typical food for us (the menu was handwritten in Indonesian anyway), accompanied by Arak – the infamous Indonesian spirit. It is moonshine alcohol and in some cases, people got poisoned, because it contained ethanol. So I was a bit sceptical, but Agung assured us, that this is the best Arak he has ever tasted. And he is still alive, so there it was – my proof.

Arak comes in a coke bottle
Arak comes in a coke bottle
Local warung - our dinner place in Sanur
Local warung – our dinner place in Sanur
Taking our order
Taking our order

The dinner was a spicy and delicious combination of beef, chicken and squid dishes and that was the perfect ending of a perfect day.

Our dinner arrived!
Our dinner arrived!
Our bill was only 150 000 Rupiah - such a bargain
Our bill was only 150 000 Rupiah – such a bargain
Mixing the spices in a traditional way
Mixing the spices in a traditional way

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